Who went to the range this last week?  I'll admit it, it took a bit to get my warm self up off the couch and on to the cold range.  It was like 34f with wind.  I got there, but then the car was warm.  Finally I got out and carried my gear over the the shooting stands which are a really nice feature at the DRPC range, but then I walked into the range room to get something and it was sooo warm.  Well, you get the picture.  It was that type of day.

 

 

 

Who went to the range this last week?  I'll admit it, it took a bit to get my warm self up off the couch and on to the cold range.  It was like 34f with wind.  I got there, but then the car was warm.  Finally I got out and carried my gear over the the shooting stands which are a really nice feature at the DRPC range, but then I walked into the range room to get something and it was sooo warm.  Well, you get the picture.  It was that type of day.

 

 

 

And it's that day at least once a month where every one of us who carries a gun in public and who knows the risks (and safety net) we become to others, should all go.  It's like going to the gym, except no one else is going to get hurt if you miss a session on the treadmill.  But let your perishable shooting skills deteriorate and you risk every person standing to the side of a threat, or behind them, and in some cases you didn't even know they were there.  Because you let your skills lapse.

 

I'm not saying you need to be Shooter Tim The Big Bad Range Guy.  You just need to be the guy who spends enough time at the range to keep your skills within reason.  For many of us this is once a month.  One hour, one day a month.    And don't forget to dry fire.  For every hour of range practice you should be putting in 2-3 hours of dry fire. 

 

Dry fire you can do in your living room. Verify your weapon is unloaded and then verify it once more.  Remove all live fire magazines from your working area.  Make sure there is no live ammo anywhere close to you.  Now, load 3-4 dummy rounds (you can buy these at Brownells here).  into an the mag for your handgun, and for each extra mag you normally carry.

 

 

 

 

Dry fire you can do in your living room. Verify your weapon is unloaded and then verify it once more.  Remove all live fire magazines from your working area.  Make sure there is no live ammo anywhere close to you.  Now, load 3-4 dummy rounds (you can buy these at Brownells here).  into an the mag for your handgun, and for each extra mag you normally carry.

 

 

 

 

Place your handgun in your normal carry holster and your extra mags where you normally carry those.  To be clear, at this time your weapon and ALL your mags should be loaded only with dummy rounds and your real rounds should not even be in the same room.

 

Now you can go through your stance, grip, sight picture, trigger press, and magazine reloads.  Wear the same outer clothes you'd be wearing outside.  And then by the numbers go through:

 

WITHOUT TAKING YOUR EYES FROM THE THREAT

1.  DROP whatever is in your hands. 

2,  With both empty hands grab your outer garment and lift it above and clear of the weapon.

3.  Maintain gripping the garment with your off hand and using your strong hand lift the weapon straight up like you saw us demonstrate in our concealed carry classes and practised in our Step Up class.

4.  Now, bring the weapon up to your armpit and once clear of the garment drop the garment with your off hand and achieve your normal grip with both hands.

5.  Push the weapon out from your body making not of each stage where you can fire if needed, from close to your body to the full extension.

6.  Complete the sight picture.   Your eyes should both (yes, shoot with both eyes open) be focused on your front sight and your threat and rear sight should be out of focus, the rear sight more so.

7.  At this point you can complete your trigger press, effect a magazine reload, engage other threats, whatever you think you should be practising for your skill level.  Or, safely return the weapon to the holster and do it again.   Do it over and over again until you can easily draw, reholster, achieve your grip and sight picture, change magazines, until you can do all this over an dover again without error and without thinking.   This is dry fire.

 

 

 

 

I tend to have one dry fire session once per week for 30-40 minutes at a time.  And another with my carbine.  Another with my backup weapon.  Another with my home defence weapon.  Another and then another until dry fire practice with all relevant weapon systems have been achieved.

 

 


 

I tend to have one dry fire session once per week for 30-40 minutes at a time.  And another with my carbine.  Another with my backup weapon.  Another with my home defence weapon.  Another and then another until dry fire practice with all relevant weapon systems have been achieved.

 

Now when I arrive at the range I'm only cold.  I'm not wondering  if I dry fired enough, or what more I should be doing.   Now, by the SAME numbers I dry fire once more.  Maybe several times more.  Until I'm comfortable. 

 

Sometimes I feel like Quy Chiang Kang from Kung Fu when I dry fire at the range.  People are looking at me wondering what the heck I[m doing.  I'm working the numbers, over and over again.  Until I feel 100% confident I'm safe and ready to go with live rounds.  And it's only then that I shoot the plann I made up before arriving at the range.  I try and make it different each time.

 

 

 

 

Sometimes I feel like Quy Chiang Kang from Kung Fu when I dry fire at the range.  People are looking at me wondering what the heck I[m doing.  I'm working the numbers, over and over again.  Until I feel 100% confident I'm safe and ready to go with live rounds.  And it's only then that I shoot the plann I made up before arriving at the range.  I try and make it different each time.

 

 

 

 

Today it's all about 2-3 shot strings on multiple targets from 5-25 meters away.  I'm lucky, the range is empty so I have it all to myself.  I set up multiple targets at different ranges and shoot the numbers.

 

Today was a very good day at the range.  I was shooting under 1inch groups at 5-10m and 4--5 inch groups at 25m.  I don't often practice at 25m, but lately I'm doing 25m more and more.

 

I didn't shoot more than was needed.  The purpose of my range sessions at this point is to maintain skills.  If I shoot a couple rotations clean I stop, save my ammo, or maybe  do something unplanned.;  if I notice a problem I correct it.

 

I should mention that I cherish these times alone because I find it very hard to truly practice when I'm with someone else.  I'm selfish about my  ME TIME.   But when I'm lucky enough to have someone to train with we make good use of that time as well and usually get really competitive.   All practice is good practice, but you should recognize there are different types.

 

I really love these range sessions.  And guess what?  By the time I was done I wasn't even cold any longer.  I'd worked up a sweat.. :)