We're in the last stages of developing a "step up" class that teaches you the shooting fundamentals leading to competent tactical shooting.  This is different than standing in front of a shooting bench, picking your gun up and slow firing at a target.  What I'm going to teach is at the opposite end of that.

 

 

We're in the last stages of developing a "step up" class that teaches you the shooting fundamentals leading to competent tactical shooting.  This is different than standing in front of a shooting bench, picking your gun up and slow firing at a target.  What I'm going to teach is at the opposite end of that.

 

This is where you're wearing your gun, a threat presents itself in many of the various ways they can, and you react.  You react first by taking cover if possible while drawing and preparing to shoot because if you drew you've already made that dreaded decision.  Now it's time to stay alive and stop the threat.

What's involved? Both more and less than you might think.  More in that there are many things you might not have yet considered like what makes good cover, is there a second or third threat lurking, etc. and less in that it's all about basic shooting skills and common sense.

And I don't mean "basic shooting skills" as in the way you learned in your NRA Basic Pistol or CCW class (Hey, I teach those so watchi t!) or even the way your spouse or father might have taught you.  Well, not unless they're into modern law enforcement techniques in the top 10% or so, or are active IDPA shooters.   I'm talking about erasing your mind and body of everything you've learned before and rebooting with Shooting 2.0, a new skill set that might or might not be what you've already been doing.. though probably not.  The more you learn, the more you'll realize this really is new material.

I told you in our Basic Pistol and CCW classes, you can't learn this stuff in a day or a single training session.  You learn it in steps. A certain set of fundamentals, lots and lots of practice, and then more fundamentals.    Probably around 5 levels of competence, but like mathematics in a building block approach.   One block builds on the back of the other.   "Are you sure it will be 5 levels?"  Yes.  No.  Maybe.  I'll tell you when I write my last block and would feel comfortable pinning a badge (from a shooting standpoint) on you and working a shift together.  Then I'll know.

Who can do this?   Here's the good news.  Anybody and everybody.  WOOHOO!!!  "wait a minute, isn't shooting a really competitive sport that requires lots of running and jumping?"  It can, but needn't be.  Anyone who's taken my courses has quickly ascertained I'm disabled.  I can't run, I don't walk fast, and it sucks to bend over.  Yes, this is limiting, but it came to me it's not a lot different than just getting old. 

It's a bit like bowling, there are those really fit young guys throwing the ball down the alley at 200mph and knocking down 10 pins.  In the next lane the 95 year old man with a stooped back shuffles down the lane dropping the ball and it rolls down the lane at 5mph knocking down the same 10 pins.  At any given knowledge and skill level it's all about knowledge, how to mow down those pins.  And I'd be proud to be your coach.

I've already decided you can't be expected to shell out a bunch of money for equipment right off.  So I'm going to supply all but the safety equipment.  Everyone should own and maintain their own safety gear, much like scuba divers maintain their own masks and fins.  I'll supply the guns, holsters, and mags.  You supply the ammo (9mm), hearing and eye protection, an later on knee pads because pebbles on old knees suck.  And through the use of using our gear you'll learn what work and what doesn't and how suitable your current gear is for the task.  It's 20x easier to learn on a full to near full size pistol than a tiny piece designed for deep cover.  Later on we'll teach you to apply those skills to your smallest carry pieces.

Remember college?  You were probably told that for every hour of class time you should expect to put in 3 hours of study and homework time.  Well, with shooting it's more like 4 hours of classroom time and 40 hours of practice time on your own.  So this is going to take some time.

And it's why I'm going to break our goals up into  4-5 hour classes.  These classes will be held 100% on the range and will consist of maybe 1 hour of on the range classroom, and 3-4 hours of on your feet range work.  

I'm excited.  This is something I've always wanted to do and while I have fun in the CCW classes this will be on an entirely new level.  So watch these pages, in less than 2-3 weeks I'll bring you some class dates and a breakdown of the first module.  If there's anything you'd like to see included leave a comment and I promise it will be considered and probably implemented in one way or the other.

See ya then..