Illinois State Senator Julie A. Morrison (D) 29th District introduced the LETHAL ORDER OF PROTECTION BILL (SB1291) to allow "that a petitioner may request an emergency lethal violence order of protection by filing an affidavit or verified pleading alleging that the respondent poses an immediate and present danger of causing personal injury to himself, herself, or another by having in his or her custody or control, owning, purchasing, possessing, or receiving a firearm."

This is essentially a protection order that rescinds a gunowners right to possess firearms without due process. The usage of the term "ex parte" allows a judge to issue the order without any knowledge of or input from the person the order is against. This bill sets the stage for any judge or court in Illinois to take away any gunowner’s right to bear arms based on the testimony of any family member or law enforcement officer. No real proof is required.

This is essentially a protection order that rescinds a gunowners right to possess firearms without due process. The usage of the term "ex parte" allows a judge to issue the order without any knowledge of or input from the person the order is against. This bill sets the stage for any judge or court in Illinois to take away any gunowner’s right to bear arms based on the testimony of any family member or law enforcement officer. No real proof is required.

Synopsis:

Creates the Lethal Violence Order of Protection Act. Provides that a petitioner may request an emergency lethal violence order of protection by filing an affidavit or verified pleading alleging that the respondent poses an immediate and present danger of causing personal injury to himself, herself, or another by having in his or her custody or control, owning, purchasing, possessing, or receiving a firearm. Provides that the petition shall also describe the type, and location of any firearm or firearms presently believed by the petitioner to be possessed or controlled by the respondent. Provides that the petitioner may be a family member of the respondent or a law enforcement officer, who files a petition alleging that the respondent poses a danger of causing personal injury to himself, herself, or another by having in his or her custody or control, owning, purchasing, possessing, or receiving a firearm. Establishes factors that the court must consider before issuing a lethal violence order of protection. Provides for the issuance of ex parte orders and one year orders. Provides that if the court issues the order the respondent must: (1) refrain from having in his or her custody or control, owning, purchasing, possessing, or receiving additional firearms for the duration of the order; and (2) turn over to the local law enforcement agency any firearm, Firearm Owner’s Identification Card, or concealed carry license in his or her possession. Establishes factors for renewing and terminating lethal violence orders of protection. Amends the Firearm Owners Identification Card Act and the Firearm Concealed Carry Act to make conforming changes. Defines "family member of the respondent", "lethal violence order of protection”, "petitioner", and "respondent".

* The views and opinions expressed on this web site are solely those of the original authors and contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of